Apple Claims Leak Of iMessage “Not A Bug”

iMessage icon

Yesterday we reported that an apparent bug had appeared in Apple’s iMessage service that allowed iMessages to be sent to a stolen iPhone. The whole world could read the iMessages of the person whose iPhone had the bug.

Earlier this week, Gizmodo had reported that a customer who went to Apple’s Genius Bar began receiving iMessages to and from the Genius serviced her iPhone.

One possible theory of iMessages being leaked for the world to see was that the Genius took his personal SIM card and inserted it into the customer’s iPhone as part of a series of unofficial and unapproved diagnostic efforts to fix the customer’s phone. An Apple representative explained to The Loop’s Jim Dalrymple that the issue in the Gizmodo story was not a bug, but instead was the result of the Genius not following protocol.

“This was an extremely rare situation that occurred when a retail employee did not follow the correct service procedure and used their personal SIM to help a customer who did not have a working SIM,” Apple representative Natalie Harrison told The Loop. “This resulted in a temporary situation that has since been resolved by the employee.”

The act of installing an employee’s personal SIM card into a customer’s iPhone is not an approved procedure at the Genius Bar.

Gizmodo reported that a customer was having difficulties with her iPhone 4 and took it to the Genius Bar to be serviced. When it was returned, the phone was in perfect working order. However, one storage thing happened. The iPhone was displaying every incoming and outgoing iMessage meant for the Genius. This is because, Genius had inserted his personal SIM card into the iPhone during the diagnostic process, it registered with Apple’s iMessage servers and began sending all of his messages to the customer’s phone.

iMessage Stolen iPhone

A number of customers have reported similar iMessage issues. Some say that messages continue to go to a stolen iPhone after a remote wipe and a SIM card deactivation. Apple may explain the solution to be “toggle iMessage on and off” in the Settings app. This is something impossible to perform remotely on a stolen phone.

Source: Mac Rumors

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