Wearble Technology Improves Employee Productivity And Job Satisfaction

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The finding of a new research says wearable technology can have a positive impact on employee productivity and job satisfaction. The research report, titled The Human Cloud at Work (HCAW) A Study Into the Impact of Wearable Technologies In The Workplace, states that wearable technology has various benefits and can improve an employee’s productivity. The Human Cloud at Work is an experimental is an experimental design research collaboration between the Institute of Management of Studies (IMS) at Goldsmiths, University of London and Rackspace [pdf].

Wearable technology is arguably the biggest trend since tablet computing so it’s natural that employees and businesses will look to use these devices in the workplace. Our initial findings suggest that there is benefit to be gained from doing so alongside risks and opportunities that need to be proactively addressed

says, Dr. Brauer.

131021113632-chris-brauer-oped-story-bodyA primary study was executed among participants who were provided with three wearable devices. One was GENEActiv, a high-speed accelerometer wristband which measures activity and movement, NeuroSky Mindwave for monitoring brain activity and the third one was a LUMOback device to check activity and posture.

The results of this study indicate that employees with wearable devices were 8.5% more productive and 3.5% more satisfied. The research will be carried out once again by taking a bigger sample size and varying the duration of the study.

Dr. Brauer also cites that the organisations will benefits manifold by using this technology, there’s also a section in the research paper which states how wearable technology plays a vital role in the business environment that is ever dynamic and competitive.

The research paper is a collaboration of Goldsmiths with Rackspace for a two year period. The paper comprises of three studies: the HCWA; a quantitative survey by Vanson Bourne; and another quantitative study by Vision Critical.

There’s still time till wearable technology actually hits a workplace and is on the verge of actual implementation, as policy and regulatory frameworks restrict the adaptation of wearable technology in the workplace.

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Computer Science Student from University of Cincinnati turned writer with my first iPhone. I like to travel, make friends with tech minded folks on internet. I write on my 13″ MacBook Pro Retina and iPad Air Cellular. Black iPhone 5S is my sidekick.